Paradoxes in game design

Started by Legend, Sep 09, 2018, 01:02 AM

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Legend

1. The reward for playing good is decreased difficulty.

2. The optimal strategy is to never use consumable items.


What are your thoughts? Can you think of any?


Dr. Pezus

Why is nr 2 optimal??

Xevross

Why is nr 2 optimal??
idk but I never use consumables because I'm always saving them for something super hard down the line. Of course in most games it never comes and you're left with loads of unused items at the end.

Dr. Pezus

idk but I never use consumables because I'm always saving them for something super hard down the line. Of course in most games it never comes and you're left with loads of unused items at the end.
I do the same but that doesn't mean it's optimal lol

Legend

I do the same but that doesn't mean it's optimal lol
It's optimal from the point of view of trying to be the best player at every moment. Ending a fight without using items is better than ending one with using items.

darkknightkryta

Yeah, that's how it's like when I play RPGs. I always use magic instead. Though with that said; I had to use an Elixir against Sephiroth in Kingdom Hearts.

the-pi-guy

1.  Make a game that changes difficulty based on player skill.  Good players would be rewarded by the game getting even harder.  

2.  Make a game that rewards player for using as many consumable items as possible.  Perhaps replenishing their entire stock and getting a few bonus items after ever battle.  

Legend

1.  Make a game that changes difficulty based on player skill.  Good players would be rewarded by the game getting even harder.  

2.  Make a game that rewards player for using as many consumable items as possible.  Perhaps replenishing their entire stock and getting a few bonus items after ever battle.  
1. That's not a reward, that's a punishment. Physcologically players would need a narrative built around that or other rewards to make it work.

2. Then at that point, they aren't consumables. They're more like spells with a recharge time.

the-pi-guy

1. That's not a reward, that's a punishment. Physcologically players would need a narrative built around that or other rewards to make it work.

2. Then at that point, they aren't consumables. They're more like spells with a recharge time.
1.) The reward is beating the challenges.  It's how a lot of games work.  It's not like a puzzle game rewards the player by getting progressively easier.

2.) Different perspectives!  

Legend

1.) The reward is beating the challenges.  It's how a lot of games work.  It's not like a puzzle game rewards the player by getting progressively easier.

2.) Different perspectives!  
1. Then it's not an rpg. That's just a standard difficulty curve as you get deeper into a game.

the-pi-guy

I was just trying to be silly.

Legend

I was just trying to be silly.
Games are serious business! /s

I just always feel weird as a player with stuff like this. On one hand Zelda botw is odd how the boss gets too easy, but on the other hand I really hate the L4D way of handling it.