Science General Discussion

Started by Legend, Sep 02, 2014, 07:17 PM

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Legend

I really like my number theory class though.  

The big thing in a lot of the class is modulus.  

So like 7=2(mod 5)
Basically it looks at the remainder of what's left after dividing.  It's this: %
But it has a ton of really useful properties and connections with prime numbers.  
So useful in programing too.

the-pi-guy

Apr 11, 2018, 05:26 PM Last Edit: Apr 11, 2018, 05:29 PM by the-pi-guy
I am doing an assignment for QM and have to give 3 reasons why electron classically spinning doesn't make sense. 

I've looked through like 20 books, as it's supposed to be cited.  Like 10 of them don't give a reason, 8 of them give the reason and it's an awesome reason, and the other 2 give another reason and it doesn't really make a whole lot of sense. 

No third reason anywhere. 

It's also kind of annoying to see the same few lines in every book. 

Legend

I am doing an assignment for QM and have to give 3 reasons why electron classically spinning doesn't make sense.  

I've looked through like 20 books, as it's supposed to be cited.  Like 10 of them don't give a reason, 8 of them give the reason and it's an awesome reason, and the other 2 give another reason and it doesn't really make a whole lot of sense.  

No third reason anywhere.  

It's also kind of annoying to see the same few lines in every book.  
Is it because electrons are fundamental particles and as such can't have a forward defined? Or can fundamental particles have a non uniform shape/property?

That's weird that the books would use the same lines but I guess it makes sense. Probably all just rephrasing the same original source.

the-pi-guy

Is it because electrons are fundamental particles and as such can't have a forward defined? Or can fundamental particles have a non uniform shape/property?
Some books will simply say it is a point particle and therefore spinning doesn't make much sense; which I think in a sense fits your explanation.  

But if we were to imagine the electron were able to spin classically, what would the velocity have to be on the equator?  

The answer is that even with the biggest radius the electron could have, the electron has to be spinning much much faster than the speed of light.  

the-pi-guy


Legend


Legend



Legend


Xevross

NASA's Curiosity rover finds organic matter on Mars - CNN
Ooh nice.

It'd be crazy if we found out that Mars was just like Earth millions of years ago but all life died out for some reason.

NeverDies

 I wonder how sensationalized this article is. Would a NASA scientist view this as pretty routine, or is it extremely unusual?
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the-pi-guy

Jun 09, 2018, 02:37 AM Last Edit: Jun 10, 2018, 01:22 AM by the-pi-guy

the-pi-guy


the-pi-guy


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