New Boston Dynamics robot demonstration

Started by Legend, Jan 18, 2023, 08:24 PM

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Legend


Legend

Believe it or not this video really shocked me. The jumps are great and everything is definitely impressive, but the walking and fluidity is pretty pore compared to their past videos.





These demonstrations from 1 and 2 years ago show a far more elegant robot. The flip in the new video is great but the walking and grabbing looks drunk and slapdash. Like after it puts down the plank, the left arm has weird overdone motion till it grabs the bag. It also reveals that they are avoiding showing it walk. Atlas has great athletic jogging for parkour but it looks super out of place when just moving on the ground. Looking back, the last time they showed Atlas walk was in 2018. It's disappointing that they haven't improved walking as much as they've improved other aspects.

It's pretty cool though that after all these years, Atlas finally has hands  8)

Maybe I have unrealistic expectations after Tesla's demo:
Spoiler for Hidden:
<br><img src="https://media.tenor.com/95ynQWyXYC4AAAAC/tesla-bot-elon-musk-robot.gif" alt="" class="bbc_img"><br>




kitler53

without a doubt this tech is impressive as fudge.

....no idea how they make this into something that does cost-effective work in a general way.  sure,.. useful for sending into the ruins of a collapsed building to search for survivors.   ..but do we expect this to replace the 670,000 carpenters in america?  i hear "manufacturing" but there are far less complicated and efficient machines that can do that sort of work.  it's not like an automation line needs a machine that can do a backflip off a platform...
          

Legend

without a doubt this tech is impressive as fudge.

....no idea how they make this into something that does cost-effective work in a general way.  sure,.. useful for sending into the ruins of a collapsed building to search for survivors.   ..but do we expect this to replace the 670,000 carpenters in america?  i hear "manufacturing" but there are far less complicated and efficient machines that can do that sort of work.  it's not like an automation line needs a machine that can do a backflip off a platform...
Their smaller robots are selling pretty well.



Their humanoid robot however is just for research at the moment.

kitler53

meh.   in the industry this is simply called "rounds data".   it's a workaround for actually instrumenting your equipment.  it's expensive when a human does it but more importantly is a really shaming view of your equipment.   it's hard to make an informed decision when you only get data once or twice a day compared to instrumentation that gives a reading every second.  

the problem with legacy sites is the instrumentation needed to be planned as part of the initial build of the equipment.  retrofiting instrumentation has been expensive or outright impossible on plants that were created in the 50's before computers were a thing anyone was thinking about.

so...
1. modernally built equipment (especially in established industries) now build the required instrumentation into the equipment.

2. there has been massive advances in "smart sensors" that can be installed wirelessly and provide real time data at a fraction of the cost.  it wasn't that long ago that the expected cost to retrofit an asset with modern instrumentation was expected to cost ~$100,000.   today it's more like $5,000.


the dogs are cool and all but it won't be a big industry trend.   no one is happy with rounds data regardless of how it is collected.
          

BananaKing

without a doubt this tech is impressive as fudge.

....no idea how they make this into something that does cost-effective work in a general way.  sure,.. useful for sending into the ruins of a collapsed building to search for survivors.   ..but do we expect this to replace the 670,000 carpenters in america?  i hear "manufacturing" but there are far less complicated and efficient machines that can do that sort of work.  it's not like an automation line needs a machine that can do a backflip off a platform...
The tech probably isn't ready for mass market yet. But at certain points even the cell phone was unpractical. But technology moves forward and this builds up to bigger things. Just think creative and imagine where this tech can be in 30 or 40 years


And of course, there is a practical use for this tech now days..... weapons.

Legend

meh.   in the industry this is simply called "rounds data".   it's a workaround for actually instrumenting your equipment.  it's expensive when a human does it but more importantly is a really shaming view of your equipment.   it's hard to make an informed decision when you only get data once or twice a day compared to instrumentation that gives a reading every second.  

the problem with legacy sites is the instrumentation needed to be planned as part of the initial build of the equipment.  retrofiting instrumentation has been expensive or outright impossible on plants that were created in the 50's before computers were a thing anyone was thinking about.

so...
1. modernally built equipment (especially in established industries) now build the required instrumentation into the equipment.

2. there has been massive advances in "smart sensors" that can be installed wirelessly and provide real time data at a fraction of the cost.  it wasn't that long ago that the expected cost to retrofit an asset with modern instrumentation was expected to cost ~$100,000.   today it's more like $5,000.


the dogs are cool and all but it won't be a big industry trend.   no one is happy with rounds data regardless of how it is collected.
It's not a big industry by any means. The current robot dogs are very much a solution looking for a problem, but companies are finding uses.

I'd wager by the end of 2030 though, walking robots will explode in popularity like drones did last decade.
The tech probably isn't ready for mass market yet. But at certain points even the cell phone was unpractical. But technology moves forward and this builds up to bigger things. Just think creative and imagine where this tech can be in 30 or 40 years


And of course, there is a practical use for this tech now days..... weapons.

kitler53

It's not a big industry by any means. The current robot dogs are very much a solution looking for a problem, but companies are finding uses.

I'd wager by the end of 2030 though, walking robots will explode in popularity like drones did last decade.
afaik drones are popular for only 2 things:
1. toys
2. dropping grenades' on Russian soldiers.

as "industry" found a use for them yet?  i remember reading last fall that amazon canned their research into using drones for deliveries. 

so like,.. yeah drones are much more popular than they were before for a %change perspective but it's not like its a major industry.   ..and i'm not going to call it a "fad" or anything but i found this site and i'm while not 100% certain the data is legit but it certainly gives me "confirmation bias":

https://www.statista.com/outlook/cmo/consumer-electronics/drones/united-states#revenue

...basically there was explosive growth for a bit when it was a "new" thing but the market topped off pretty quickly.  1.4 B $ WW isn't a tiny number but like.. put it in context.  Toothbrushes is a 7 B $ industry.

https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/toothbrush-market-103880

          

Legend

afaik drones are popular for only 2 things:
1. toys
2. dropping grenades' on Russian soldiers.

as "industry" found a use for them yet?  i remember reading last fall that amazon canned their research into using drones for deliveries.  

so like,.. yeah drones are much more popular than they were before for a %change perspective but it's not like its a major industry.   ..and i'm not going to call it a "fad" or anything but i found this site and i'm while not 100% certain the data is legit but it certainly gives me "confirmation bias":

https://www.statista.com/outlook/cmo/consumer-electronics/drones/united-states#revenue

...basically there was explosive growth for a bit when it was a "new" thing but the market topped off pretty quickly.  1.4 B $ WW isn't a tiny number but like.. put it in context.  Toothbrushes is a 7 B $ industry.

https://www.fortunebusinessinsights.com/toothbrush-market-103880


Yeah drones are used for a lot of things besides delivery haha. I specifically know of them in agriculture and pest management.

Also the commercial drone market looks to be around $30 billion but I'm just going off random google results too.