Programming Thread

Started by the-pi-guy, Mar 13, 2016, 10:39 PM

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Legend

I really like playing with the bigdecimal class in Java. Although I wish it was a little friendlier.  
I'm jealous of bigdecimal. If I was in Java I could just use that.

What makes it unfriendly? I only know it exists but I don't know how it's used.

the-pi-guy

I could have swore there was something awful about it.  

But maybe I just didn't like that operations were done like:
One.add(two);

Legend

I could have swore there was something awful about it.  

But maybe I just didn't like that operations were done like:
One.add(two);
Oh yuck why would you ever set something up like that!?

the-pi-guy

Oh yuck why would you ever set something up like that!?
I don't like it.  It gets messy with bigger programs.

Legend


the-pi-guy

Sometimes I like working inside my limits even when it makes no sense to do so.  

Like I'm really tempted to make my RPG from scratch, instead of learning how to use a game engine.  

Legend

Sometimes I like working inside my limits even when it makes no sense to do so.  

Like I'm really tempted to make my RPG from scratch, instead of learning how to use a game engine.  
Well making your own game engine could look pretty good on a resume.  :)

the-pi-guy

Well making your own game engine could look pretty good on a resume.  :)
Yeah.  That's pretty much the only good reason to, though.  
I've thought about it.

Legend

Yeah.  That's pretty much the only good reason to, though.  
I've thought about it.
Well are there any cool features you'd want your RPG to have that'd make it unique? If you do make your own engine, then it'd be nice if players could tell it wasn't just an off the shelf solution.

the-pi-guy

Aug 12, 2018, 07:24 PM Last Edit: Aug 12, 2018, 07:28 PM by the-pi-guy
Well are there any cool features you'd want your RPG to have that'd make it unique? If you do make your own engine, then it'd be nice if players could tell it wasn't just an off the shelf solution.
This is for my language learning game.  I want to flesh it out and make it awesome. 

But I don't know of any very unique features to make it stand out. 

Legend

This is for my language learning game.  I want to flesh it out and make it awesome.  

But I don't know of any very unique features to make it stand out.  
Oh I guess I just jumped in to assuming a 2D rpg.

If you're making a 3d game engine, that's just so much freaking work. (or is your language game 2d?)

the-pi-guy

Aug 12, 2018, 07:43 PM Last Edit: Aug 12, 2018, 08:32 PM by the-pi-guy
Oh I guess I just jumped in to assuming a 2D rpg.

If you're making a 3d game engine, that's just so much freaking work. (or is your language game 2d?)
I was thinking 2d like early Pokemon.

We cover this in a graphics course:

1. Graphics hardware, specifically the somewhat obsolete fixed function pipeline (OpenGL) and the programmable pipeline
(WebGL and GLSL) that has replaced it.
2. Two-dimensional graphics
3. Math necessities beyond the course prerequisites
4. Transformations in two- and three-dimensions
5. 3-D Viewing with the synthetic camera
6. Modeling 3-D shapes with polygon meshes
• Meshes obtained from various data collections
• Meshes obtained from "pure" mathematical surfaces, that is, surfaces with coordinates defined strictly from (paramet-
ric) functions.
• Approximating/interpolating curves and surfaces
7. Hierarchical modeling of 3-D objects
8. Lighting and Shading - the algorithmic rendering ladder
• The Phong reflection model and its variations, the Lambertian and Phong-Blinn models
• Gouraud shading
• Phong shading
• Texture mapping
• Bump mapping
• Reflection mapping
• Ray tracing
• Photon mapping
• Radiosity
9. Raster Algorithms - as time allows

Legend


darkknightkryta

Sep 11, 2018, 01:51 PM Last Edit: Sep 11, 2018, 02:57 PM by darkknightkryta
So I was looking to create a joypad to jamma interface with a Raspberry 1/2 tau.  Turns out Python is the only way to do it without stabbing yourself in the face with a soldering iron.  But since I'd rather stab myself in the face with a soldering iron than use Python, I've been looking at the memory mapped code used in C.  dang macros.  Took me about an hour, but I figured out the justs of it.  There's still some things I need to figure out with what it's doing with the memory addresses and how macros work(In my 4.5 years in university I never had to use a macro).  I'm almost in a state where I can use the code, but I still need to figure out how input works since the programmers felt an example using the built in resistors is more important than an example with input.
Never mind, I found the input code.

the-pi-guy

Do you ever run a program, and then it runs way faster or better than you expected, and you're totally convinced something must be up?

I wrote a program to check 500 billion combinations of numbers , and it finished in like 5 minutes.  That didn't seem so bad.

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